Bad things come in three’s

Bad things come in three’s

They say that bad things come in three’s. If that’s true then the good news is we’re done!  Have to say, it has been a rough, not to mention expensive past few weeks.  If you follow us on Facebook then you already know what I’m referring to.

It started with three dogs who came down with kennel cough.  Except for the fact that it’s highly contagious to other dogs, it’s mostly just a nuisance.  Certainly not life threatening unless you already have a sick or immune compromised dog. But trying to contain it so it doesn’t spread through a kennel is difficult and time consuming – changing smocks between rooms, wearing gloves, tons of disinfectant and using separate exercise areas. Employees who handle those dogs can’t go in our other dog rooms and instead clean the cats; it’s a lot of juggling, but we made it work. Thanks to our diligent staff and volunteers no one else came down with the cough and all three dogs recovered and have been adopted.

When we were at the end of the coughing dogs’ quarantine – we got in a sick large breed puppy.  He was just abandoned in a crate at our door without a note or any information, (what were the owners thinking!). We didn’t know he was sick (we assumed he was just shy and overwhelmed in a new place) so he was in our stray room. When we realized he really wasn’t feeling well we immediately tested for Parvo and, sadly, he was positive. Had we known he was sick we would have isolated him and immediately begun treatments. Now we had to disinfect our whole stray area! Fortunately he hadn’t been taken out to any of our dog fields or other rooms of the shelter.  Sully, as we named him (because he crashed and survived!) wasn’t terribly young or frail and responded well to treatment – gallons of fluids, anti-nausea mediation and antibiotics.

A couple days into his treatment there was another box at our door (is this a thing again? Suddenly we’re back to having animals abandoned here!) This time with two very sick, very young Rottie type puppies. Immediately suspecting the worse, staff set them up in ISO and started treatment. Parvo is one of the few words that will strike fear into any shelter workers’ heart. Many puppies don’t survive and many of the bigger, more crowded shelters can’t risk the spread of the disease and euthanize immediately. We are fortunate to have a separate isolation area to quarantine these animals so we do try to save them. But sadly, these two puppies were already too sick and first one, then the other, succumbed in spite of our best efforts.  Heartbreaking.

Then, believe it or not, we got in three injured animals in the same week! A young pup with a broken leg, a teenaged cat and then separately a kitten, both with broken pelvises. What are the chances of that? The estimate for surgical repair was $5,000 – a price way over our head especially if you multiply it by three animals. We shopped around, begged and pleaded for help and through the generosity of VCA (Veterinary Corporation of America) found a local vet hospital and surgeon willing to take on our cases at a much reduced rate.

Upon further examination and diagnostics, it was determined that the puppy’s leg was not a complete fracture and could heal if just splinted and given cage rest. The older kitten, Ramblin’ Rose had surgery and a plate put into her hip and she is doing well. The kitten was discovered to have much more extensive injuries and a poor prognosis and, sadly, was euthanized. Again our hearts were broken. Sometimes we just have to focus on those we can help and give them all we can!

We have no budget for these kind of medical cases and rely on the Animal Shelter League for financial support. Donations are gratefully accepted online at animalshelterleaguerp.org, or cash and checks can be brought or mailed to the shelter (301 J. Rogers Lane, RP 94928). Help us be ready for the next Sully and Rose that comes limping, or coughing (or worse) through our doors!

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