Spay & Neuter Assistance

FREE cat spays for low-income residents of RP and the City limits of Cotati.  Dog surgeries at a very low price.  Appointments are required.  Call our Fix-it Clinic message line at 588-3531.

Don’t need that level of assistance – just looking for a discount? FAIRE vouchers are available – save $50 on spay/neuter surgeries at participating veterinary clinics.  Stop by the shelter to pick one up or call FAIRE at 544-5713 to get one mailed.

Most cats and dogs should be spayed or neutered at an early age. Animal shelters are crowded with unwanted pets that, in many cases, are the result of accidental or poorly planned breeding. Unfortunately, the majority of these unwanted pets are never adopted.

Spaying or neutering your animals helps contribute to better health and a longer life for the pet, and peace of mind for you.

Why you should spay or neuter your pet

Spaying or neutering contributes to a longer, healthier life for your pet.

Spaying your pet before her first estrous cycle (that is before she reaches sexual maturity) greatly reduces her chances of developing breast cancer and helps to eliminate the threat of uterine and ovarian cancer and uterine infection, which are common occurrences in unaltered females.

Neutering your male cat or dog may prevent testicular tumors and may prevent prostate problems. Neutering also decreases the possibility of perianal tumors and hernias, which are commonly observed in older, unaltered dogs. Because neutered cats are less likely to roam, the threat of abscesses caused by bites and disease transmitted by fighting are greatly reduced.

Many veterinarians encourage that pets be spayed or neutered at an early age (as early as 8-10 weeks old). Be sure to consult your veterinarian for the best time to have this procedure performed.

You are helping to solve the cat and dog overpopulation problem.

Each year, millions of unwanted cats and dogs are euthanized (put to sleep) at shelters across the country. Many of these are the result of accidental breeding by free-roaming unaltered pets. The more pets spayed or neutered, the fewer cats and dogs will have to be destroyed.

An altered cat or dog is a better pet for your family.

No family wants to cope with an unwanted litter. Spaying prevents your pet from giving birth to unwanted kittens or puppies.

Males neutered early in life are less aggressive toward other males and are not distracted by females in heat. A neutered male will be less tempted to leave your property and cross that dangerous street searching for a mate. Neutered males are also less likely to mark territory with their urine.

Spaying your female pet eliminates the problem of stray males camping in your yard and decreases her desire to roam and breed.

Common excuses for not spaying or neutering pets

My pet will get fat and lazy.

Neutering or spaying may diminish your pet’s natural tendency to wander, but will not effect the overall activity level. When pets do gain weight after being altered, it is usually attributed to a combination of overfeeding and inactivity. Just remember to adjust the amount of feeding to your pet’s activity level.

My pet’s personality will change

Any change will be for the better. After being altered, your pet may be less aggressive toward other animals, will be less likely to wander, and may have a better personality. Spraying (urine marking), which is often done by dogs and cats to mark their territory, diminishes or ceases after pets are altered.

We can sell kittens or puppies and make money.

Even well known breeders are fortunate if they break even on raising purebred litters. The cost of raising such a litter – which includes stud fees, vaccinations, and other health care costs – consumes most of the “profit”. Finding good homes for these kittens and puppies can be difficult, and shelters are already crowded with unwanted pets. Leave the breeding to professional cat and dog breeders.

My children should witness our pet giving birth.

There are several educational alternatives for witnessing your pet giving birth. Contact your veterinarian and local library for this valuable information. Remember, there are already too many cats and dogs in shelters. Be sure to avoid this excuse so as not to contribute to the unwanted pet population.